© Kenneth Craig Lambert 2020
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Incandescent Bloom
2020

Artereal Gallery

Invisible Forces

2020

Diptych

Left: : 60 inch monitor within Aluminium frame, 45 minute loop, unique edition

Right: Silica, Pigment, Biodegradable glitter on plywood board, aluminium frame, 137cm x 80cm x 8cm framed

Arranged Structures

2020

Left: 60 inch monitor within Aluminium frame, 60 minute loop, 60 inch monitor, unique edition

Right: Silica, Pigment, Biodegradable glitter on plywood board, aluminium frame, 34cm x 80cm x 8cm framed

34cm x 80cm x 8cm framed

68.5cm x 80cm x 8cm framed

Variable Observations

2020

Silica, Pigment, Biodegradable glitter on plywood board, aluminium frame

34cm x 80cm x 8cm framed

34cm x 80cm x 8cm framed

34cm x 80cm x 8cm framed

34cm x 80cm x 8cm framed

Without Measure

2020

Silica, Pigment, Biodegradable glitter on plywood board, aluminium frame

80cm x 68.5cm x 8cm framed

Particular Drift

2020

Silica, Pigment, Biodegradable glitter on plywood board, aluminium frame

80cm x 68.5cm x 8cm framed

Half-Life

2020

Silica, Pigment, Biodegradable glitter on plywood board, aluminium frame

80cm x 34cm x 8cm framed

Gravitino

2020

Silica, Pigment, Biodegradable glitter on plywood board, aluminium frame

80cm x 34cm x 8cm framed

February 2020, Artereal Gallery presented Incandescent Bloom a solo exhibition of new paintings and digital artworks by Sydney-based artist Kenneth Lambert. The exhibition will be Lambert’s first collaboration with Artereal Gallery and takes its title from the lyrics contained within a 1964 Charles Mingus track, Freedom. It is a poetic way of expressing the potential of the human condition. A gathering of complex molecules to make life in its

variant’s, our potential for creation and also self-destruction.

The exhibition will begin with the presentation of a diptych comprised of a digital (video) work paired alongside an abstract painting (made by painting with melted biodegradable glitter). Using this diptych as a central starting point, the works that follow are visual exploration of the concept of acceleration, as articulated through the artist’s own creative process – with each work essentially breaking apart the piece that has come before it.

Working with a palette dominated by blue and black, Lambert explains “I mostly work in monochrome; however I am greatly influenced by music in my practice, it is the score that drives the creative output. In music there is a history the colour blue being used to describe the complexities of the human condition. So, for me the value blue becomes intrinsic when describing the human condition and the natural world that encompasses it.

When asked to further articulate his creative process Lambert describes his mode of working as a need “to question, to gather, to mix, to grind, to dissolve, to encase, to propel, to scrap, to compress, to expand, to persuade, to wait, to wait, to wait, to wait, to revise and then start again.

This is the process I’ve engaged in over the last 6 months an attempt to express the notion of acceleration onto surface. As a digital based artist, it felt like the next logical step to escape the screen and spill out from the virtual world and into the physical.

The investigation began out of frustration, politicians misrepresenting the truth pertaining to climate change. The science had a reoccurring theme of acceleration, which triggered my interest. Whilst on residency in Finland in early 2019 I began the process of understanding the concept of acceleration through the lens of physics, the natural science that studies matter, its motion and behaviour through space and time.

Emulating the scientific approach, I decided to create work that is to be process led. The process of acceleration had to contain the key factors, a change in velocity over time. I liken my process to that found in the study of physics, one hemisphere is the “Theoretical”, through mathematics there

is an attempt to understand the forces that define the natural world. The second which is known as “Experimental” is the real world proof of the theories. There is a natural tension between theory and proof which I wrestle with as I transition between both hemispheres in order to create.”

View Exhibition Catalogue

“I am a creative creature attempting to satisfy a curiosity for the world around me. I am inspired by scientific research because it’s also seeking to satisfy that curiosity.

As a contemporary artist I am path finding, seeking ways of steering that creativity so that it has purpose. The themes that I am drawn to often emerge from a sense of anxiety I detect around me, like individual autonomy and the environment.

I’ve always been drawn to opposing forces, co-existing dualities, order and chaos: time and space. One cannot exist without the other. So it is with my process that I have to attempt to understand something in order to relish the chaos.

The two hemispheres of physics have that. The theoretical making sense of the world through hard core mathematics, opposing the slightly crazy side - the experimental 'let’s smash particles together’ to prove this theorem.”

Kenneth Lambert